Tag Archives: softie

Felt Sweetheart Candy Box Tutorial

16 Jan

 Felt Sweetheart box for your sweetheart

Nothing says Valentine’s day like the iconic pink sweetheart box.

Here’s our felt version.

DIY felt valentines day sweetheart box back

You will need: 

1- 9″x 12″ sheets Pink felt-  Bubblegum Felt*

3″ x 3″  scrap White Felt*

5″ x 5″ scrap Red Felt – Lipstick

3′ x 3″ felt scraps for heart shapes Sparrow, Chartreuse, White*

Crafting vinyl

1 pkg – Sweetheart buttons

Stuffing

* Matching thread (you can use 1 strand of embroidery thread in place of standard thread.)

Embroidery thread in Hot Pink

 Templates (at the end of post)

Felt and button sweetheart box

Cut

Cut both 2 front and back pieces (A) and 2 each of the side piece (D, H)  one felt backing (B) from pink felt

Cut heart shape from the center of one of the A pieces.

Here are some tips for cutting small shapes or try Andie’s method

Cut out felt heart shape (I) from white, chartreuse, and sparrow colored felts.

Cut (C) from white felt.

pinning templates to felt with scotch tape

Cut  one each of templates E, F, and G from and 1 D from red felt.

How to make a felt candy box valentines day craft

 Trace out the heart shape onto template B try to leave lots of spacing around the heart  it will be easier to sew the vinyl down.

Cover heart shape with buttons – This doesn’t need to be exact.

heart shaped buttons

Sew vinyl over button pieces.

Vinyl and felt - Valentines day craft

Throw a few loose buttons in if desired.

 Set Aside.

Scalloped felt heart - V-day Felt craft

Stitch template C onto template A

stitch felt ribbon onto felt box

Stitch down red D piece using an overcast stitch and matching thread. Trim ends of felt so they fit at an angle.

How to make a felt bow- with templates American Felt and Craft The Blog

Make a Felt Bow

Loop E piece over as shown and stitch down. Wrap F piece around the loop and stitch down. Lay onto G piece and secure with a few stitches.

Add ribbon to front of felt valentines day box

 Place the ribbon in the center and stitch down.

Make a felt valentines day box front complete

Place vinyl covered B piece behind the box front. Carefully stitch together using matching thread and hiding the stitches under the loose scalloped heart edge. Set aside.

Sew hearts to back of felt valentine

Lay out heart shapes (I ) as shown and stitch each down with a running stitch and matching thread.

Felt V-day. Sew sides onto felt valentines day box

Sew sides together (D and H) Attach back piece  to frame with an overcast stitch with matching thread.

Felt Sweethearts box Valentines Day CraftSew front on, stuffing before you close.

Felt valentines day craft - sweetheart box tutorial

Valentines Felt and button sweetheart  box

Print templates as full page.

See our full line of Felt & craft supplies at American Felt & Craft.

See our full line of Felt & craft supplies at American Felt & Craft.

We’re planning out future felt blog posts- tell me what you’d like to see on our blog.
Happy Crafting!

~Andie

Check out some of our other sweet felt tutorials:

Easy felt Rose Pillow tutorialDIY Felt Giraffe Tic Tac Toe Tutorial

Palace Guards Royal Baby Rattle Tutorial

19 Jun

 Hand-stitched  British Palace guard rattles- Tutorial and templates - lots of other felt projects too!

The Royal Family (not to mention the rest of the world) is looking forward to welcoming a new baby prince or princess into the world this July.

Never one to miss a chance to celebrate this hand stitched felt rattle is our tribute to Price William and the Duchess of Cambridge’s bundle of joy.

Although these sweet British Palace Guards do get a little rattled when you shake them they remain loyal and steadfast.

 Hand-stitch a few of  these Charming British Palace guard rattles to watch over the little prince or princess in your life. Full Tutorial and template.

 Hand-stitch a few of  these Charming British Palace guards to watch over the little prince or princess in your life.

You will need – per guard

8″ x 8″ (21 cm x 21 cm) Black felt

3″ x 5″ (8 cm x 13 cm) Flesh Colored Felt ( Bisque, Camel, Hot Chocolate)

4″ x 9″(11 cm x 23 cm) Red Felt (Tomato Soup)

2.5″ x 1″ (6 cm x 3 cm) White felt scrap

Noisemaker or rattle insert (Rattle, Jingle Ball, or squeaker)

Thread to match felts

Gold Embroidery threads

Eye Colored Embroidery thread

Stuffing

Royal Baby Rattle Template (at bottom of post)

Felt Rattle Tutorial- How to make a place guard baby rattle - Lots of other felt projects too!

CUT

2 each of the pants, and hat template from black felt.
4 hand pieces and 2 face templates from flesh colored felt.
2 jackets pieces from red felt and 1 belt from white felt.

hand

Step 1:

Lay two hand pieces together and overcast stitch up the sides using matching thread, adding a small amount of stuffing before closing. Repeat with other hand pieces and set aside

.details

Step 2:

Add eyes to face and buttons to jacket by making french knots with embroidery thread.

Add chinstrap details using embroidery thread and a back stitch.

Sew belt onto waist.

sides3

Step 3:

Using matching thread and a running stitch.
Sew hat to head, head to jacket, and jacket to pants. Repeat with backside pieces.

sides4

stufflegs

Step 4:

Using an overcast stitch and black thread sew pant legs together and stuff.
stuffchest

Step 5:

With red thread stitch jacket sides together and stuff.

Add hands to ends of sleeves with a running stitch.

If desired add rattle to chest before reaching the neck.
stuffhat

Step 6:

Stitch up the face and hat with matching thread stuffing as you go.

Rattle Template- Print full size

palacetemplates Rattle Tutorial - Buckingham Palace Guards - Welcome new royalty into your home with this Felt Palace Guard Baby Rattle.Welcome new royalty into your home with this Felt Palace Guard Baby Rattle.

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American Felt and Craft online felt and craft store , over 100 colors of felt by the sheet! Ships worldwide.

Jelly Beans!

30 Jan

What is it that makes Jelly Beans so exciting? It could be that every bean is a new taste sensation sure to be delicious (except of course the nasty black jelly beans and the slightly mouthwashy green ones), or their bright colors heralding in spring and warm weather days, maybe it’s because they are only available once a year. No matter what the reason I always feel a little giddy when I see them roll out the first bags of beans at my local stores.  What little felt food play store would be complete without a few boxes this Easter?

For this project you will need:

Colored roving: I used both sets in our mini packs (brights and pastels).  About 6″ of roving per bean.

Dish soap

9″ x 6″ piece of felt in color  you’d like your box, I used honeydew and matching thread

White felt scrap – 1.5″ X 3″

Thin Clear Vinyl– 3x 3 square

Cross stitch thread

Sewing and embroidery needles

Scissors

Rattle insert (optional)

Templates at the end of this post.

Making the beans:

You will need to make your jelly beans and allow them to dry before the next few steps, fortunately the jelly beans dry quickly (an hour or two) and if you have some little ones around you can easily whip up a whole slew of beans in less than an hour.

To make these jelly beans you will need to wet felt them, ok breathe…don’t panic, it’s easy I swear! How easy, allow my adorable 4-year-old daughter to demonstrate:

Here is a more detailed run down.

Step 1:

Pull off the amount of roving you need from the rest (about 6″ long ). Pull into a thin strand. Starting at one end roll upwards (it may help to have slightly damp fingers) wrap around and over to create a ball shape.

Your felted piece will be approximately 50% smaller than this so you want your roving ball to be about the size of a large gum ball or quarter.

Step 2:

Once you have a reasonable facsimile of a ball shape you will need to begin the felting process. This is done by agitating and shocking your wool. If you have ever been a teenager you should be well versed in shocking and agitating. Begin by gently dunking your ball into a bowl of warm water add a small drop (almost a half a drop) of hand dish washing liquid to the top of your ball. Gently move the ball from one hand to another squishing it ever so slightly. Dunk in cool water and squish and then warm water. Lightly rub the wool so the wool catches on itself.

DO NOT roll  between your hands yet, if you do this the fibers will come apart and you will end up with a very unsightly shape.  Continue cradle and lightly squish your soon to be jelly bean from one hand to another for about 30 seconds to 1 minute better to overdo than underdo. You will need to be gentle to prevent your roving from coming apart, my daughter likes to pretend that the ball is an egg. I think that’s a good way of thinking about the level of stress you want to put on your piece at this point.

Step 3:

There! You’ve finished the hard part now to finish the jelly beans. making by rolling in between your hands moving the piece from warm to cool water to help shock the wool into place. You should begin to feel your piece firming up. While it still has some give to it roll between your palms in one direction to create more of an oval shape.

Step 4:

From here you want to manipulate into a  bean shape you can do this many different ways. Working it so that one end is thinner than the other, by thinning out the middle or by pressing a finger into the center while pulling the ends upwards. Experiment and see which method works best for you.

Lay out to dry and repeat as desired.

Making the Jelly Bean Box

Step 1:

Cut out template pieces

Cut 2 of each A, B and C from the color felt you have chosen for your box.

Cut the jelly bean shape out of only 1 of your A pieces.

Step 2:

Place your vinyl piece over the window area and stitch down using a running stitch.

Step 3:

Trace out the letters for Jelly Beans onto your white felt scrap insuring that they will fit on the front of your finished box. Using cross stitching thread and whatever style stitch you like , stitch the letters into place.

Cut around the letters to create a more fun feel.

Stitch label into place.

Step 4:

Assemble the box by adding one side piece (B) to the side of your completed front and overcast stitch up the side.

Continue with the other side piece.

Add back to the box by stitching side pieces (B) to back (A).

Stand box on it’s head and stitch the bottom piece (C) in place using the overcast stitch.

‘Before continuing you will need to decide if you plan on having an open jelly bean box or a closed one.

If you plan on using a rattle insert place, box front side down and add your jelly beans until nearly full, slip the rattle into the back so it isn’t visible and adjust jelly beans if needed. Place box right side up again and add top the same way you added the bottom.

To make an open box start attaching your top from where you want the opening to begin, stitch around until you reach the matching point on the other side. Continue your overcast stitch around the unfinished edges to create more of a polished look.  Enjoy!

Templates

Copyright American Felt and Craft for personal use only.

Don't forget our great Easter collection pattern available now for a limited time only!

NEW pattern out now!

5 Dec

AFC’s newest pattern “Waiting for Santa” is available now for instant download at:

http://stores.americanfeltandcraft.com/-strse-403/Felt-Food–dsh–Waiting/Detail.bok

As a bonus the first 10 people to scoop up our new pattern will receive it at 50% off so hurry before Santa arrives!

Gulf Coast Catch

6 Jul

Gulf Coast Catch Instantly downloadble PDF pattern available now!

Our new pattern : Gulf Coast Catch features some of the Gulf Coasts’ best offerings. Fish, Shrimp and Clams!!

This pattern was created to specifically to help the animals and fisherman effected by the BP oil Spill. American Felt and Craft has always taken our commitment to protecting our environment seriously. And in an effort to help 100% of our profits from this pattern, EVERY PENNY, will be donated to 2 charities to help those effected by this horrible event. We hope you will join us in helping those effected and we know you will enjoy this beautiful pattern.

The first of the two charities we donate to will be the Gulf Coast Oil Spill Fund which focuses  on helping  fishermen and their families but we know that losing livelihoods pales in comparison to the massive loss of life and homes for millions of animals so please join us in selecting the second of the charities we donate the profits to:

For more on these Charities:

American Bird Conservancy

Friends of the Earth

Green Peace

Gulf Coast Oil Spill Fund

Here’s to leaving this world a better place for our children!

~Sheila and Andie

Gulf Coast Catch available now at : http://www.AmericanFeltandCraft.com

Chop Chop- Cut Apart Felt Food Carrot, Free Pattern & Tutorial

22 Jun

Free Felt cut apart veggie tutorial from American Felt and Craft #FeltFood

What’s more fun than play veggies ready for slicing?

Besides a barrel of monkeys, which actually just sound dirty and loud to me but to each his own I guess… where was I… oh yeah veggies.

Here as promised is the felt carrot tutorial. You can do this with any felt food you’d like you’ll just need to modify the pattern by cutting it into smaller pieces and creating a Hook and Loop or Velcro inside. American Felt and Craft now stocks 16 diffrent colors to match with nearly anything you can dream up.

Keep in mind that most quality Velcro (aka hook and loop) is very strong so for the sake of your pieces posterity I would recommend “cutting” pieces apart with a plastic, wooden, or even felt knife rather than pulling on them.  The little blue knife from Ikea  pictured above is perfect for this.

For this project you will need:

1 sheet Sweet Potato, or orange colored felt (will make 2 carrots)

1 sheet Fresh Cut Grass or dark green felt (will make 2 carrots)

Stuffing, I used 100% wool legacy stuffing but any stuffing will do

1 6inch strip of colored hook and loop in Fresh Squeezed. (will make 2 carrots with quite a bit left over.)

Thread to match orange colored felt.

If you need help with stitches please refer to Putting it all together

Step 1 cut pieces from templates, below;top

Cut 1 carrot top from fresh cut grass felt.

Cut everything else from Sweet Potato color

carrottemplate

Step 2.

Roll stem up stem piece and stitch up as shown, stitching can be done with any color thread,  it won’t show.carrottop1

Step 3

Cut Hook and Loop (aka Velcro) into small circles, obviously you won’t be using this color.

velcrocircles

stitchintoplace

Step 4.

Match up rounds you have cut out, you should have two of each place scratchy side (hook) onto one of the pieces and soft side (loop) to matching piece, stitch into place as shown. Make sure the right pieces fit together, it will be hard to correct later.

Step 5.  Sew up sides of rings using a running stitch as shown below, turn inside out so seam doesn’t show

carrotrings1

 lovefelt

ring1Step 6.

Sew bottom to slice A,  the dot represents Hook and Loop (Velcro).

Depending on how far in you made your seam on each carrot ring the bottom and top circles may need to be trimmed a bit to fit properly.

gathertop

Step 7

Set up like a cup and gather stitch around and lightly stuff.

finishedtopStep 8.

 Place stem into carrot and pull gather stitches tightly, pass needle through the stem a few times to hold it into place, the top is done.

ringtopandendStep 9

Sew tops and bottoms on to remaining rings as specified above. Stick Hook and Loop (Velcro) sides together and Viola! A felt carrot!

chopchop6

OPTIONAL: To create, carrot “dents”  make a large running stitch in side of finished slice, Hiding knot in the seam. Come up through top seam, pull tightly and knot.  Repeat as desired.

Please let us know if you like the felt carrot pattern. We would love to see finished pictures!

Enjoy and please remember this pattern is for personal use only!

~Andie

Felt Food 101 – Lesson 4 Putting it all together

16 Jun

felt food how to fall veggies

This is part 4 of our how to make felt food series, I’m Andie a felt food addict and co-owner of American Felt and Craft. Please stop into our store sometime and take a look around. And as always if you have any questions I am just an email away and I’m happy to share my knowledge and a few of my favorite patterns with you!

Felt Food 101 – Lesson 4 Putting it all together:

Putting it all together

There are many ways to connect to pieces of felt, each has it’s advantages and disadvantages. Here I will discuss machine and hand stitching, stitches to use and gluing, you can also needle felt, felt food but I will touch on needle felting in another post.

constructionscissors

Sewing felt

Machine sewing vs. Hand Sewing

Some shapes and forms can really only be done with an old fashion needle and thread. Machine sewing is an option, for some pieces but you’ll need to remember to enlarge your pieces since the machine sewn version will be about 3/4 size.  If you are concerned about all the fuzzies getting into your machine you can avoid this by putting a piece of paper under the seam line and one over it. I recommend regular scrap copy paper I have heard others use newsprint but I would be afraid of marking up my felt with inky fingers. You may also want to use the paper method if you have trouble holding your felt in place on the machine because it is acrylic since synthetics tend to slide. Also keep in mind that removing a seam from machine sewn felt can be extremely difficult if  not impossible.  I recommend simply cutting the seam out. Machine sewn pieces are also more likely to be flatter and you will require the use of  more felt since the seams will diminish a sewn pieces’ size. With hand sewn pieces what you see is pretty much what you get there are usually very few surprises since you can easily see problems as soon as they arise and removing your stitching is very simple. Personally I believe that hand sewing is by far the best method for making felt food unless your making a lot of the same item.

Hand sewing stitches

When hand sewing it’s interesting to note that suprisingly  few stitches are used in felt food construction here is a basic walk through and illustration thanks to our friends at The Popcorn Tree .

overcast

 Overcast Stitch/ Whip Stitch

(note: overcast stitch and the whip stitch are in fact the same stitch however whip stitching is done on two pieces of fabric to join them and overcast stitching is done on only one piece to prevent fraying. Most people use the terms interchangeably and we’re suckers for peer pressure so we’ll use the terms interchangeably too!)

  Without a doubt this is the stitch I use most often when making felt food. It easily joins to pieces together without losing any fabric to seams and lays remarkably flat. Best of all with a matching thread it almost disappears into the finished piece.

Whip/ overcast stitching is very forgiving since the seam does have a bit more adjust-ability than other stitches. A word of caution; placing stitches too far apart on an item you intend to stuff will cause stuffing to fall out. The stitches should be about 1/16″ apart to prevent this. Many people will pull too tightly on the thread when sewing this way. There is no need to use more thread tension when stitching this way, pulling thread too firmly will not help avoid gaps and will create a rounded seam, or lip which may effect your finished piece.

  running stitch 

  Running Stitch

This is the basic in out stitch taught to most of us as children and is used for connecting pieces which need to remain very firm and rigid. Sewing this way also helps when you want to prop of your piece since when turned inside out the pieces will not lay flat. Other than it’s simplicity the running stitches big advantage is how easily it can be removed. Ideally you want each stitch to be about 1/4″  in length or smaller.

 

gatheringGathering and Basting Stitches.

These stitches are not used as often in felt food design but are very useful for making rounded or dome shapes. The only real difference between the gathering stitch and the running stitch is the tension in the thread. Gathering stitches are pulled tightly, the effect of this on felt is somewhat less impressive than it is on other fabrics due to the thickness of the felt. The gathering stitch and the basting stitch are also essentially the same but the basting stitch is most often temporary and since it will be  removed large stitches are not only acceptable but actually easier to work with.

backstitch

  The Back Stitch

Back stitch is most often used as an outlining stitch, and is often used to create text or outlines on a felt piece.  As the name suggests small stitches are made in a similar fashion to the running stitch but the needle returns to complete a stitch at the same time it creates a new one.

blanket

 

Blanket Stitch

The Blanket stitch can be called a more decorative version of the overcast/ whip stitch. The biggest advantage to blanket stitching is that because of the obvious top seam it is very distracting and uneven stitching is not as noticeable. The blanket stitch is used to create a decorative edge and will hold felt together in much the same way as overcast stitching. This stitch is not subtle and is made to be shown off.
This  stitch can be a problem since you will not only create a seam but a larger and more obvious one and the top line of the stitch holds the pieces a bit farther apart from each other than the whip stitch.

To create a blanket stictch  you will need to start the same way you did with the overcast but instead of creating a second overcast stitch place your needle under the first stitch on from right to left. Continue on this way, making an overcast stitch and ducking underneath it until your project is complete.

frenchknot

 French Knots

French knots are used to create seeds or dots on a piece, they take a bit of practice but look stunning when completed. The key to this method is to not pull the thread too tightly at the end. The knot should gently “sit” on top of the fabric.

satinSatin Stitching

Satin stitching is used to fill in an area with thread this is rarely used for felt food but in some rare cases it is used to create text or shapes that are too small to be made of felt. Satin stitching couldn’t be any easier. since it is basically one wide running stitch repeated over and over again. The trick to sewing with a satin stitch is to first outline your shape with a back stitch so that your edges remain smooth, simply satin stitch over your outline and viola!

sewingaknotSewing a knot

The holy grail of sewing! Most of us learned this in home ec. This knot is essential for sewing felt food since this know doesn’t require you to pull the thread and the knot is nearly invisible.

1. Begin by creating a loop where you intend to end your peice and pass your needle through that loop then pull thread through.

2. You should have a completed knot however this is not strong enough to hold long term.

3. Repeat step one on top of your original knot for added strength, many people pass the needle though the body of the knot and then create their second loop and then continue passing the needle though the loop and pulling. I personally do it this way and find it makes for a very tight knot.  

 fudgedesserts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gluing felt

Really you want to glue it? Are you sure you wouldn’t rather just put a few stitches in it or easier still needle felt it? No. OK then here goes, it seems that the easiest way to hold pieces of felt together is to glue them. However this can be tricky since most thin or water based glues like Elmer’s will just absorb into the felt this is especially true if you are working with wool or a high wool blended felt because of the loft. I really recommend not gluing your felt unless you absolutely have no choice since this will make the felt harder and more difficult to drape or sew. If you must glue you should  avoid hot glue, since you will most likely have a noticeable ridge where the hot glue was laid down, and it can be a bit messy. Also when working with acrylics use of a high temp glue gun can be dangerous since acrylic is a plastic and will melt. In all instances I recommend using Beacon’s felt glue it will work on the thinnest acrylic without soaking through and I have seen it hold felt pom poms in place very nicely, it dries 100% clear and has no yucky fumes. It’s very similar to Elmer’s glue but thicker and not named Elmer’s. 🙂

If you are making something for a child I would recommend gluing and running a few stitches through for safety and if you are beading something for a child I would really recommend gluing since over time felts can shift making threads longer and making beads more easily broken off and swallowed. If you cannot find Beacon’s felt glue my second choice would be tacky glue, and my third choice would be quitting and having a glass of wine instead.

Unique glue situations (never thought you’d see those words together huh?)

If you only want to glue down a felt piece to hold it for stitching I recommend using a glue stick just make sure your glue stick is soft and be prepared for it to be all “felty” after use.  THIS WILL NOT HOLD LONG TERM! In fact in some cases it may not hold at all. This is dependent on the humidity, your felt and how lucky you are. After gluing you will need to remove the felty part from your glue stick to avoid it being transferred onto your next glue stick project and you should try to wait for it to dry before attempting to sew or your needle may get gooky from passing through the glue stuck? sticked? stucked?  felt.

Glues can also be used to accent a piece as in the case of American Felt and Craft’s Hot Fudge Glue.

Other Options

You can also Needle Felt pieces together however that’s a long and detailed post for another day.

Last week: Needles                                                                                             Next week : Felt Food 101 Stuff it

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