Tag Archives: sewing

Sewing or Gluing Sequins To Felt- A Refresher

8 Dec

How to sew sequins to felt

Do you love sequins?    Do you love felt?     Boy I know I do!

Combine the two and double up on the awesome!

Here’s how to sew down sequins.

Rows of Sequins:

sew sequins to felt

Sequins: Hot Pink from American Felt and Craft

To sew down rows of sequins start by coming up the back of your piece with your threaded needle.

sewing down sequins how to

Slide your sequin down the thread.

tutorial for sewing sequins to felt

Move needle behind your sequin.

How to sew sequins onto felt ornaments

Push needle through and come up one space in front of the sequin you just placed down.

sew sequins to felt

Pull the needle through and thread the next sequin repeating the process.

Sewing down single sequins or sequins that are spaced further apart is also very easy.

How to sew down a single sequin

Come up through the bottom of your piece. Slide sequin down thread.

Create a small stitch to hold half the sequin, repeat on the other side. These two stitches are enough to secure the sequin but without another sequin behind and in front of it like the ones above the sequin is more likely to catch on items. You can also hold it down with an even four stitches but keep in mind  the more thread you use the less sparkle.

While we’re on the subject there is a right way and a wrong way to secure sequins to felt using felt glue.

Tips for using felt glue

Sequins: Grape Soda from American Felt and Craft

Felt is made up of small bits of fibers all tangled together. If you press the glue into the fibers it becomes trapped inside the fibers making the piece stiff but failing to properly secure the sequin to you piece for the long haul. If you press into the felt piece when gluing the sequins the bond will be stiff and brittle and the pieces are more likely to pop off.

How to glue sequins to felt

Instead float the sequin on a thin pillow of felt glue as the moisture evaporates the sequin will become more even with the felt and the glue will dry clearly.

properly glued felt piece

When your sequin dries it should look like this.

Happy Crafting!

~Andie

Stop by the Shop for 30 colors of Sequins,  Felt Glue and a whole lot more!

30 sequin Colors from American Felt and Craft

Domestic Bliss – Pint Sized Pincushions

5 Dec

Felt Pincushion Ornament - American Felt and Craft - The Blog

Welcome back to Domestic Bliss Week.

Today’s free felt ornament tutorial is a slightly more modern take on the classic “tomato” pin cushion.

These guy are pint-sized about 2.5″  and are made from surprising shades like white and ice blue.

Aren’t they just the sweetest?

You will need:

TEMPLATE (at the end of this post)

2″ x 3″ Tomato  base color we used:  Granny Smith, Ice , White   Peanut Butter and Mod Paisley

Top Felt Color we used:  Orange Whip, Ice, Orchid White and Peanut Butter 

Embroidery thread

Sewing Pins

Felt Glue

Fingernail polish (optional)

Felt Pincushion Tutorial

Cut 1 large circle for the base and one small star shape for the top.

For tips on cutting small or detailed shapes see: Cutting Detailed Shapes

or try Andie’s Method 

Paint pins with fingernail polish to match Christmas Tree

Using fingernail polish paint pins to match your color scheme.

It may take 2 or 3 coats depending on your pins base coat.

Tomato pincushion topper

Attach a loop with embroidery thread to the center of the star-shaped top.

Set aside.

step1 DBW Pincushion tut

Using embroidery thread gather circle and stuff before closing, you will be covering up the top so you will not need to cover the stuffing completely.

Section out the felt ball - American Felt and Craft Domestic Bliss week pincushion

Using contrasting embroidery thread section the ball shape into 6 portions.

See our free felt food tutorial Felt Pumpkins for detailed pics on sectioning.

IMG_9671Sew top over exposed stuffing.

Felt Pincushion Ornaments - American Felt and Craft

Play with the pins until you figure out the best way to arrange them.

Remove one pin at a time so you don’t lose your chosen spots.

Glue Using felt glue - glue pins to pincushion for safety

Dip each pin end into felt glue and poke back into cushion.

You should see a small bead at the base, this will dry clear and the build up will prevent any painful surprises under your tree.

Pint Sized Pincushion felt Christmas ornaments DBW

Pint-sized Pincushion template

Pint sized Pincushions an easy DIY felt Christmas ornament tutorial

Happy Crafting!

~Andie

Our Cyber Monday sale is still on – cause we’re Rebels like that! 

But today’s the VERY LAST DAY! Hurry! 

American Felt and Craft Cyber Monday Sale

Tune in tomorrow to see how we top off this Domestic Bliss Tree…(it involves about 200 pink sequins!)

Domestic Bliss Christmas Tree

You may also dig: Hipster Week

Felt camera ornament tutorial

Domestic Bliss – Seamstress Cameos Felt Ornaments

2 Dec

Seamstress Cameo Felt Ornaments- Domestic Bliss Week

Welcome darling so pleased you could join us for Domestic Bliss Week.

First on the schedule are these lovely seamstress cameo ornaments featuring a scalloped felt frame around a darling sewing  themed silhouette.

Free felt Ornament tutorial seamstress Cameo - Domestic Bliss Week

These sweet felt Christmas ornaments go together very quickly and make a great kids craft project.

You will need:

TEMPLATE (at the end of this post)

2 –  9″ x 12″ sheets or 1/4 yard White Felt

5.5″ x 8″  Scrap Muted Green Felt like Granny Smith

8″ x 3″ Scrap Rosy Purple Pink felt  like Orchid

8″ x 3″ Light Blue felt like Ice

2″ square Scrap Patterned felt like Mod Paisley

Matching Thread

Grey or Silver Embroidery Thread

Leather Punch

1 yard of Ribbon for Hanging

Fray Check or Clear Nail Polish

Sequins in:

Dragonfly

Coral

Fuchsia

Mermaid

Peacock

Moss

For Scissors Ornament:

Cut 1 scissor piece and 1 scalloped oval from Ice felt and 2 ovals from white felt.

For tips on cutting small or detailed shapes see: Cutting Detailed Shapes

or try Andie’s Method 

To cut centers from felt mark out the area to be cut out lightly in pencil and fold over to create an open space, work scissors around slowly until you have completely cut away the unwanted area.

opencenterDBW

Stitch scissor shape to one of the white oval pieces  and add sequin detail in Peacock.

Feel free to do this on the other side for maximum Stepford points.

DBWcam1

Sandwich scallop between the two ovals and using a running stitch and white thread stitch together.

For Sewing Machine Ornament:

Cut 1 scissor piece and 1 scalloped oval from Granny Smith felt and 2 ovals from white felt.

DBWcam3

Stitch machine and dragonfly sequin into place. Create the sewing machine needle with grey or sliver embroidery thread.

Felt sewing machine ornament pattern

Sandwich scallop between the two ovals and using a running stitch and white thread stitch together.

For Pin Cushion Ornament:

pin cushion felt ornament tutorial

Cut 1 pincushion piece from patterned felt and 1 scalloped oval from White felt and 2 ovals from Orchid felt.

Sew cushion piece down. Use grey embroidery thread add “pins” attach sequins to ends.

Assemble as above.

Punching a Hole in Felt: 

How to punch holes in felt - using a leather punch felt

Using a leather or heavy-duty punch you can easily punch through multiple layers of felt. It’s best to do this AFTER sewing your felt ornament together.

Cameo Felt Christmas Ornaments - Domestic Bliss Week - American Felt and Craft - lots of free felt ornament tutorials

You can stitch around the hole for added durability but if you are using good felt it shouldn’t be necessary.

Add Ribbons: 

Cut 8″ of ribbon and thread through the hole. Tie a knot and slide to the back.

Cut 5″ of ribbon and tie into a bow around the loop.

Fix into place with a quick stitch through the center to hold both the bow and the loop. Use fray check or clear nail polish on raw ribbon ends.

Finishing a felt ornament with ribbon - use clear nail polish to keep ribbon from fraying

DIY Felt Cameo Ornaments

Cameo Felt Ornament Pattern Templates

Happy Crafting!

~Andie

You are cordially invited to Domestic Bliss Week, all this week on  ‘The Blog’

Domestic Bliss Week American Felt and Craft - Coffee Ornament Tutorial

You may also dig: Hipster Week

Felt camera ornament tutorial

Stop by our store:

See our full line of Felt & craft supplies at American Felt & Craft.

See our full line of Felt & craft supplies at American Felt & Craft.

Felt Food 101 – Lesson 3 Needles, How to make felt food.

8 Jun

felt food how to fall veggies

Please stop into our store sometime and take a look around. And as always if you have any questions I am just an email away and I’m happy to share my knowledge and a few of my favorite patterns with you!

Felt Food 101 – Lesson 3 Needles:

needlesAFC

Differences in sewing needles:

There are a ton of different needles out there so I just thought I would take a minute to cover the bases. The first and most important thing to note about needles is that they are all sized in the same manner. The smaller the number the longer and thicker the needle.  I agree that this is misleading and annoying, and yes I think they do it that way just to mess with people.

smallerlargerNeedles are sized in numbers from 1-12, guess which is the smallest? If you guessed 12 then your obviously a quick study, a cheater or you already know a little about needles. If you guessed 1..see I told you it’s really annoying.  Now that you know a thing or two about sizing lets get down to the knitty grittyfudgedesserts

Types of Needles

130x13-SharpsNeedlesSharps– These are you everyday standard needle. When one refers to a sewing needle chances are this is what they are referring to.  These are your standard Joe sixpack  needle, their tips are sharp (some needles aren’t so don’t make that face at me!) and they are middle of the road on length. Available in sizes 1-12

150x6-MillinersNeedleMilliners Needles– These are very long needles sometimes called Straw needles they most often used to make pleats, sew  ribbon embroidery and embellish hats, hence the name.  They are usually available in sizes 3 to 12.

150x8-EmbroideryNeedle Embrodiery Needles(s0me people call them crewel but I find them to perfectly lovely and very likable…sorry couldn’t help myself there) These needle have the same sharp tip but are a bit longer since the eye of the needle is longer to accommodate thicker threads. Available in sizes 1-10

beadingneedlefeltfoodBeading Needles– beading needles are the needle you should use when, you guessed it placing beads onto fabrics, the eye of these needles are skinny (we should all be so lucky) to accommodate beads sliding over them without getting caught. In sizes 10 – 15

feltfood101Quilting-BetweenQuilters needles or betweens– Since these little babies are used for hand quilting you’d think they’d be the perfect choice for hand sewing felt, you’d be wrong. They are very short and thin, making them easily lost in thick felt and can feel a little clumsy in the hand when working with tough material. They are however great for making very even small stitches. They are usually only available in sizes 7, 8, 9, 10, and 12 (medium short to Danny Divto short, love ya Danny!)

DarnerNeedleAFCDarning Needles, sometimes called Darners- A Darning needle is a larger big eyed blunt tip needle. The larger sizes are often used in wool work however for felt food purpose’s a sharp or embroidery is probably your best option.

150x8-EmbroideryNeedleDoll Needles– If Quilters are the Danny Divito of the sewing needle world doll needles are the Arnold Schwarzenegger of needles. (Twins was on a lot when I was growing up) While like any needle they will vary in length and thickness they are usually long strong needles, useful for sewing through very thick felt food, such as felt Pumpkins, apples etc…

* I am not getting into the felting needle in this post since they aren’t used for sewing.

Gee thanks but I just want to know what to buy!

Just plain old sewing needles will do just fine when sewing felt food i.e Sharps.  I however like to use embroidery needles because I am a rebel and because they are a bit longer and easier to thread plus if I decide to do any embroidery onto my project I don’t have to dig out another needle. I find that for sewing felt you’ll want a thicker longer needle, I have actually bent one or two of the smaller sharp needles. I would use anything from a 3 to a 6 (remember the smaller the number the larger the needle) You will want to avoid too thick of a needle since it can leave a noticeable entry hole in your felt, although these will disappear after time or you can just gently rub at the surrounding felt and it will usually blend in better. I also use  a doll needle for sewing into thick objects and beading needles for you guessed it, beading!

Can I sew felt food with a sewing machine?

Nothing beats the easy and versatility of hand sewing when working with something small or thick however you can also use a sewing machine for most of your sewing applications involving felt food, this is very nice if you’re making a lot of something. The Majority of the time I think just loading the bobbin and thread takes more time than hand sewing and hand sewing seems to add a charming personal touch and can be done while watching re-runs of Bewitched because your BFF thinks the Tony’s are dumb, yeah I am talking to you Amelia! When using a machine there will be draping and curving issues that are unworkable since most machines are really limited in the kinds if stitches they can create.  Another downside to using a machine is that if you should make a mistake the stitches can be hard to remove and since you can no longer use cross stitch threads finding the right color of thread and then winding a matching bobbin can be a nightmare.

If you are looking to buy a sewing machine I would highly recommend talking to friends and family to see what they like to use. My favorite resource in this area is the sewing machine repair shop, these are usually listed in the phone book as sew and vacs, a good place will be able to give you some tips on what’s good, what’s not, what needs the most repair and maintenance and most importantly what costs the most to maintain. 99 % of the time they will also sell used machines, and generally offer a guarantee. You can also try Craig’s list or eBay although the cost of shipping can be prohibitive and it’s hard to know if something is in good working order until it’s too late.

Last Week : Thread              Next week:  Putting it all together, stitching and glues

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