Tag Archives: felt craft

Baby Bunnies with Carrot Bottles

30 Mar

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What’s more adorable than a bunny? A baby bunny obviously. These simple DIY bunnies feature removable diapers and carrot shaped bottles. These little guys go together in no time and are a great DIY felt craft for spring or anytime you need more baby bunnies in your life.

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Felt baby bunny pattern and tutorial free pattern craftYou will  need:

Felt for bunny body, inner ears, and tail,  we used White, Peanut Butter and Grey*

2″x 2″ scrap Pink felt for inner ears and noses we used Amaranth Pink*

Felt for diaper we used Honeydew, Sunshine and Sparrow

3″ x 3″ scrap orange felt for carrot, we used Carrot *

3″ x 3″ scrap green for carrot top, we used Cilantro

Black DCM or cross stitch thread

Stuffing

Felt glue (to fix diaper closed optional)

Bunny babies pattern template (end of post)

*Matching Thread

baby bunnies from felt

Cut:

2 bunny bodies, 2 of each bunny ear and 1 bunny tail per bunny

1 diaper from color of choice

1  inner ear and one nose from pink felt

1 carrot, 2 carrot strips from orange felt

1 set of carrot tops from green felt

felt bunny pattern freeStitch down nose and inner ears to one of the sides of both felt bunny ears and nose to body.  Stitch face details onto bunny. Use french knots for eyes.

bunny2Sew ear fronts to backs with an overcast stitch. Leave the bottom open to stuff.

how to make a felt bunnyStitch the ears to the body with a running stitch and then continue to overcast stitch around the outside stuffing each section as you go.

Pattern for felt bunny craftTo make felt diaper

felt diaper pattern Sew tail to the center back. Diaper can be folded on or glued if you don’t plan on changing any bunny diapers.

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To make carrot bottle

Felt carrot for baby bunnies pattern and tutorial

Stack two strips on top of each other and sew down along the tip.

Fold so rounded edge is on top.

Overcast stitch along side. Sew small gathering stitches stitch loosely along top of carrot.

Stuff lightly. Stack carrot tops together stitch through base and pull to close up top.

Run the needle through the top and carrot a few times to secure.

Sew level stitches along the carrot body to give it a few dents. Knot. Fluff out carrot top.

Stop by the shop:feltad

Happy Crafting!

~Andie

Baby Bunny Template PDF

bunny pattern

DIY felt bunny pattern baby bunnies

free felt patterns and tutorials, felt bunnies

You may also like these free felt patterns

DIY Baby Kraken

Spring Bunny Garland Pattern

Felt Gerbera Daisies – Pattern and Tutorial

 

 

DIY Felt Four Leaf Clover

12 Mar

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These simple felt four leaf clover will allow you to add a touch of green to anything. Best of all these DIY felt shamrocks stitch together in minutes!

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Easy felt four leaf clover3″ x 6″ Green Felt per clover, I used Fresh Cut Grass

Matching thread

Sewing Needle

Clover template (at the end of post)

Make a four leaf clover from feltSet one of the shamrock shapes aside.

Fold one of the clover leaves together, sew a few stitches to hold the fold. Felt cloverHow to make a four leaf clover from feltRepeat with all leaves. DIY felt four leaf cloverPlace the shamrock pieces together and over cast stitch around the sides to hold.

Green Felt

Happy Crafting!

~Andie

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How to make a four leaf clover

Felt Chestnuts Christmas Craft

30 Nov

Felt Chestnut Christmas Craft

Roast some felt chestnuts by an open felt campfire this year, string them up for felt chestnut Christmas ornaments, a unique nature inspired felt banner or scatter them along your holiday display, the options for these guys are endless. Best of all this felt Christmas craft can be made from scraps and sews together SO fast and easy. I found these look best when you make them in various sizes so I have included three size variations on the craft template.

You will  need:

Scrap felt – about 3″ x 3 per- Chestnut color I used Auburn but you could easily use a darker shade like Brownie or Chocolate

Scrap felt 1″ x 1″ per -Chestnut top color I used Camel

Thread to match nut colored felt.

Stuffing.

Cut:

One side and one front from Chestnut color

One top from top color.

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Stitch open area of the side piece with a quick overcast stitch.

How to make a felt chestnut

Attach the front piece with an overcast stitch and matching thread.

Making felt chestnut Christmas craft

Stuff. Lastly sew on the top piece with an overcast stitch and that’s it!

Felt Chestnuts Christmas Craft

Now make like a squirrel and fill your home with these fun Christmas crafts.

Happy Crafting!

~Andie

chestnuts felt DIY

Chestnut Template

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Stop by the shop:

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You may also like:

DIY felt snowman Christmas ornaments.

DIY felt snowman ornament tutorial

Sweet seamstress cameos felt sewing ornaments for Christmas trees. Free felt Ornament tutorial seamstress Cameo - Domestic Bliss Week

Felt bear Christmas ornaments

Felt bear Christmas Ornament DIY tutorial

DIY Spaghetti and meatballs Italian dinner

7 Sep

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My first rule in designing felt food is to try to make it as interactive as possible. After all every little chef wants to do some serious cooking.

This DIY felt food meal will allow them to use every bit of the play kitchen. A budding chef can “bake” the meatballs and bread sticks, “cut” and “boil” the pasta noodles, “cook” the sauce and garnish the plate. I’ve kept the noodles connected to save sanity and to make them easy to “roll” out and “cut” I hope these small details make this a treasured menu item in your little ones’ restaurant.

This is a easy felt food set to make with really great results. If you are a newbie or just need a refresher I would encourage you to check out our Felt Food 101 series

Need a brush up on stitches? We got you. Check out our post on stitches. 

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Here’s everything you need to make felt Italian meal for two featuring; 2 plates of mess free pasta and sauce, 4 bread sticks and 6 meatballs. 

1- 9″ x 12″ felt sheet for Pasta Sauce (makes 2) I used Poinsettia *

2- 9″ x 12 felt sheets in a creamy pale yellow for bread stick bases and pasta. I used Buttercream*

1- 9″ x 12″ sheet felt light beige for bread stick tops I used Pastry*

1- 9″ x 12″ sheet brown felt for meatballs (makes 6 meatballs) I used Teddy Bear*

4 x3″ Scrap of green felt for basil leaf (Optional) I used Cilantro

Embroidery thread in a herby green and pale tan

Stuffing

*Matching thread

DIY felt food- Pasta Sauce
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To make the pasta sauce simply sew two of the sauce shapes together with an overcast stitch and matching thread.

DIY felt food- Pasta Noodles

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Fold 9″ x 12″ felt sheet in half lengthwise and cut down the center to create two long rectangles. Cut noodles at 1/2 inch intervals leaving the top 1/2″ attached. Fold top over and sew down with a running stitch and matching thread. This will keep the noodles together and make play “cutting” of the pasta dough way more fun, the fold and stitching along the top adds strength.

DIY felt food- Basil Leaves10

Cut one smaller and one larger basil leaf from green felt, you can easily free hand this since the edges don’t need to be even. Pinch the small end together and stitch once or twice to get it to fold. Place one leaf behind the other and stitch together to make garnish.

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DIY felt food- Meatballs

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For each meatball you will need one larger and one smaller felt circle. Sew a gathering stitch along the outside of the larger circle. Stuff and pull leaving a small amount of the bottom open for the bottom. Knot.

Run the needle through the meatball creating tiny stitches to create texture. Sew smaller circle to cover exposed stuffing using an overcast stitch. This flat base will allow it to sit without rolling.

Round out the meatball by rolling in your hands to distribute the stuffing.

DIY felt food- Bread sticks

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Cut 2 bread stick bases and 2 bread stick tops per bread stick. (8 of each for all 4 sticks)

Set aside half of the beige tops. Embellish the other half of the tops with french knots from pale tan embroidery thread and create herbs with small stitches in pale green.

Stitch all tops to bases with a running stitch and matching thread.

Stack one embellished side with one plain side, over cast stitch sides together with matching thread.

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Mangia and Happy Crafting!

~Andie

Felt Food Template- Print at full size.

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Need a little more spice?

How to make Felt food - Salt and Pepper Shakers

Shake up some fun with our free retro styled salt and pepper shaker tutorial.

Room for dessert?

Finish off any play meal with everyone’s favorite Chocolate Chip Cookies. cookieheader

Pop By the Shop

From Amethyst Purple to Zebra print, more felt colors and prints than you knew existed.

Leaf Peeping - Fall Felt Colors

Leaf Peeping – Autumn Leaves, Lemongrass, Sushi, Monarch Butterfly, Auburn, Beet, and Saddle Brown Felt Sheets

 

Butterfly Felt Rings- no sew

24 Aug

nosewkidscraftIt doesn’t get too much easier than this craft. These felt butterfly rings take around 5 minutes each to make and require no sewing because they simply fold together. Consider adding sequins, cut designs, stitching or tiny pom poms to your ring for an even more impressive accessory.  Decorating felt butterfly rings also makes a great birthday party craft for even the least crafty kid in the group.

Surprisingly this size worked on people from 8- adult so it’s really a one size fits all situation. There’s a rounded cut along the back to make the ring more comfortable to wear. Be sure to use a quality felt for these since the flaps will need to hold some stress. You can also glue together for a more permanent hold.  For tips on accurate cuts see this POST

butterflycraft

You will need:

5″ x3″  Felt scrap per butterfly I used White, Amethyst Purple, Banana Cream, Hot Pink, Aqua and Pink Tutu.

Template at the end of this post

Felt glue and bits to decorate (optional)

cutoutringsCute ring from template including slits in the top of one end and the bottom of the other as shown on template. butterflycraftsfromfeltCurl ring together and hook the slits to form a ring.

butterflytemplate

That’s it! butterflyringsHappy Crafting

~Andie

Glowing Fairy Jar Nightlight

18 Aug

glowfairy2This adorable fairy in a jar nightlight is no power, super soft and totally portable. Since the fairy is there completely as a friend and is free to leave at any time there is no lid on this glowing bedside jar of magic. This project is surprisingly easy and fast to put together. The toughest part is the cutting the fairy details. For a full rundown on the easiest way to cut felt shapes check out this post: Felt Lab – 5 cutting methods tested or this one: How to cut small or detailed shapes from felt. 

You will need:

Glo Felt– Large Size*

3″ x 4″ scrap black felt*

Stuffing

Cord or string for handle around 11″ -12″ long

Fairy Nightlight template at the end of post

Beans, rice, peas or stuffing pellets to add a tiny bit of weight (optional)

*Matching thread

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Cut glow felt on fold to form one long rectangle, and one top and one bottom from glow felt

Cut 1 fairy from black felt for more on this see Felt Lab- Difficult Shapes.

1Sew fairy to the center of the cut out jar, be sure to place her near the bottom so you have enough room to make the jar top ridges.

2Turn piece so fairy faces inward and overlapping the short end sides of the jar sew down with a running stitch. 3

  Sew bottom to bottom (where the fairy’s feet are) 4Turn inside out so the bottom looks rounded and fairy is now showing.

5Fold down top 1″ and around the top with a running stitch. 6Unfold and fold remaining area in half again. Sew down with a running stitch as you did above. 7Unfold and add stuffing. If you want to add stuffing beads  to insure it always stays upright if put a small amount in before adding the stuffing. It won’t take much. Stitch top to jar with an overcast stitch.

Knot each end of the cord and sew to opposite sides. with matching thread.

glow fairyPlace in a window sill to charge. 8Enjoy the magical glow. 9

Felt Fairy Jar Template:

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Happy Crafting!

~Andie

glowfairy

Check out other glow projects:

fireflyheader Glowing Ghost felt finger puppets

Felt Lab- 5 methods for cutting felt tested.

16 Aug

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Felt is a great crafting medium for at least a megaton of reasons one of which is the fabric fibers are tangled together and therefore they do not require seams to prevent fraying. This makes felt perfect for applique or detail pieces. Cutting simple felt shapes like squares, circles etc can be accomplished by simply holding the pattern near the center with the thumb while rotating the piece as you cut, but cutting smaller or detailed felt pattern pieces can be tricky. I have written about this before: Here  But since this is something I literally do everyday I thought it could use a more through evaluation.

Here are 5 well known methods (if you know of others I would love for you to let me know in the comments below) broken down and analyzed. These opinions are obviously my own and you may find other methods work better or worse for you.

The felt cutting methods are, freezer paper, a commercial spray called No Pins, packing tape, chalk outline and actual pins. The felt used is a wool rayon blend in black. I am going to break this down into 5 categories and then let you know the overall winner and why.

Catergory 1 Fuss

How hard is it to locate the product? Does this add additional cost or steps?

Freezer Paper-  Finding freezer paper sized to go through your printer can be difficult and printable freezer paper will NOT work with laser printers. It is however fairly easy to trace and draw on if you aren’t working off a printed pattern. Freezer paper in rolls is available in the bag and plastic wrap area of your local store. The rolled freezer paper is not the same as the sheets sold to go through printers, these sheets are too thin and curly and will jam up most printers even if you manage to cut it to the perfect size. You will also need an iron and an ironing board.

No Pins- I ran across this brand spray, which is a temporary adhesive for paper patterns, in a quilting store. It works by spraying onto the back of a pattern, pressing it into place and ironing to set. I had never seen the product so I am not sure how easy it is to locate. You will also need an iron and an ironing board.

Tape-  You can use any clear tape but packing tape is my go to, the cheaper the better. I find I do have to clean my scissors blades after a long day of cutting. Packing tape is easy super easy to locate, easy to transport, inexpensive and always at the ready and can be used to cover nearly any size template. It does make that classic tape sound so if you plan to craft while waiting in the hall of your kids karate class be prepared for some odd looks.

Trace – Typically you can trace with something much easier than chalk so the ease of use on a color other than black would be much better. I used a compressed chalk with a brush but tracing pens, chalk etc can be found at a craft store and may work better.

Pins-  Chances are you have some of these old standbys lying around. But if not they come in a variety of sizes and shapes and are pretty inexpensive they can usually even be located in the random house junk isle of the grocery store. They aren’t that easy to transport unless you have a needle book or pin cushion – otherwise one spill can make cleaning out your purse a real adventure. You also have to be careful where they end up which is less than ideal for you fellow couch crafters.

WINNER TAPE – while tape and trace are both very portable, locating tape is much easier than any other item on this list.

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Ease of use

Can it be used anywhere? Do you need additional tools? How portable is this technique? Is it messy? Does it make trash? How easy is it to cut?

Freezer Paper-  You need an iron and ironing board so this is not the most portable method. The paper sticks to the felt making for very easy cleanup and creates minimal waste. Freezer paper is reuseable up to 6 times depending on the quality of your brand. And the freezer paper actually helps hold the felt stiff so cutting is SUPER easy.  Nothing shifted and lines were easy to follow, the stiffness of the paper did make curves a bit more tricky to round. The paper can also lead you into a false sense of security with the size of your cuts, you may find they are too thin to hold together without the paper.

No Pins-  Oh boy! Protect your work surface! This is literally spray glue, you were warned. No matter who you are there will be over-spray and it will be gummy and sticky and you will wonder what has become of your life. Surprisingly it stuck down very easily and ironing did not seem to be needed, but I am nothing if not a rule follower so I ironed for you dear reader. Dispite it being a lot of steps the pattern held firmly and was very easy to cut and easy to go back over in the areas I missed the first time. So while the attaching experience was a pain the cutting was actually quite easy and very easy to get the proper cuts. That being said it is NOT portable unless you pre- prepare your pieces, it is messy, and did I mention you have to iron?  The pieces are said to be reusable but I haven’t tested.

Tape-  Take it with you! You can tape pieces down nearly any place. Getting it down could not be faster simply cut around your image (not exactly) and tape down. 5 seconds. It won’t move if you use classic packing tape, although it will shift as you cut and pieces start to fall away from the attached areas. Cut high detailed or small areas first to minimize any issues with shifting. The template will fall away after you cut it and the tape will have stiffened it making it reusuable and more sturdy. There will be some tape waste and you may need to clean your scissors with rubbing alchol to clear off any stickiness.

Trace – Again typically you wouldn’t use chalk unless the surface was very dark there are pens and markers available for this with “ink” washes away when wet but frankly I don’t like to wet my work, I don’t have the patience for it to dry or the fortitude not to assume it will destroy something (which very rarely happens)

My point being that this may not be a the best assessment of tracing. Cutting the template to outline was a pain, basically you have to cut your shape twice, with this method. The chalk went on easy and wasn’t nearly as messy as I assumed…until I cut it, then little flecks got on the scissors and I had to clean them off a few times during the cut. The cut was very accurate because I could clearly see my piece as I worked but this was offset by the flopping of the piece as I moved it around because unlike the other methods nothing was helping hold the felt taunt. The thin areas were much harder to cut without paper. The chalk didn’t hold detail as well as I would have liked and your ability to handle the piece is limited because the chalk will move. This method produced no trash and was very simple.

Pins-  Right away I learned placing the pins on these small pieces would be difficult. I had to move them around as I cut and any area not actually holding a pin moved away from the template. Details were extremely hard to cut because the template and the paper kept wanting to separate. The upside is there was no extra trash however you are limited on how much you could reuse the piece before the holes would make it unusable. You can pin anyplace without a lot of fuss so that’s an advantage.

WINNER TAPE – Tape is my ride or die – simply because it is so easy and quick to work with, easy to locate, it’s cheap and works with any template.

HONORABLE MENTION FREEZER PAPER – Freezer paper loses out big because of the need to iron BUT it brings up the rear with accuracy and ease to cut. Ironing pieces and setting them aside makes this a great portable option.

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Release

Does it remove cleanly? Does it fray or pull the fibers, distort or tear the shape?

Freezer Paper-  Peels off perfectly. No residue, no distortion no tearing.

No Pins-  NOPE – even with my best effort the image was distorted and the smaller pieces tore and stuck to the paper. Fibers got pulled up. I think this product is best used on standard fabrics. 😦

Tape-  Piece falls loose, no issues no distortion, no residue, The cut around the star was too thin and didn’t hold but the tape wasn’t at fault for that.

Trace – No residue stayed in the fibers, no distortion, no tearing although I did have to dust off a few areas.

Pins-  No visible holes, no distortion, no tearing.

WINNER FREEZER PAPER –  Clean and easy release.

HONORABLE MENTION TAPE – Tape also clean and easy but pulls away as you cut.

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Accuracy

Did it work, that seems pretty important.

Freezer Paper-  Works like a dream

No Pins-  The mess, the ironing, the distortion…hard pass.

Tape- Works great.

Trace – Results were pretty good.

Pins-   Results were pretty good.

WINNER FREEZER PAPER – Freezer paper

HONORABLE MENTION TAPE – Tape – oh how I love you packing tape.

cutlabBonus Points

Can you reuse it?

Freezer Paper– Yes

No Pins– Why would you want to? But can says yes.

Packing Tape– Template yes, tape no.

Tracing– No waste. Nothing to reuse.

Pins – Reuseable.

Overall ranking

  1. Freezer Paper – Excellent  precision felt cutting. (but ironing boo) 
  2. Packing Tape – Easy, low key and gets the job done.
  3. Pins – Tricky and potentially dangerous
  4. Tracing – I miss the sturdiness of the template. Floppy. 
  5. No Pins  – too many steps, makes the felt all fuzzy. 

 

What are your thoughts? What works well for you? Had any better luck with products like No Pins? Let me know in the comments.

~Happy Crafting~

Andie

 

 

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